“The Danish-German Northwest Quarter Project” by Dr. Achim Lichtenberger & Dr. Rubina Raja

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New Research in Jerash: The Danish-German Northwest Quarter Project

Arab-Byzantine coin from a coin hoard found in a house destroyed by an earthquake in Gerasa. Photo courtesy of the Danish-German Northwest Quarter Project, 2014
Arab-Byzantine coin from a coin hoard found in a house destroyed by an earthquake in Gerasa.
Photo courtesy of the Danish-German Northwest Quarter Project, 2014

Dr. Achim Lichtenberger, Professor of Classical Archaeology at Ruhr-University Bochum in Germany

Dr. Rubina Raja, Professor of Classical Archaeology at Aarhaus University in Denmark

Wednesday 9 March 2016 at 6:00 pm
Reception to Follow

About the Lecture:

Since 2011, a Danish-German team has been conducting archaeological research in the Northwest Quarter of ancient Gerasa (modern Jerash). This area, which is the highest within the walled city, has yielded dense settlement stemming from the late Roman period onwards. Furthermore, indications of earlier activity in the area have also come to light. This lecture is presented by the project co-directors and it will focus on the work done in the Northwest Quarter since 2011, with particular attention to new insights about Gerasa from the Roman period to the Mamluk period.

About the Lecturers:

Achim Lichtenberger is professor of classical archaeology at Ruhr-University Bochum in Germany. He compteted his Ph.D. at Tübingen University and his habilitation at Münster University. His research interests are the archaeology and material culture of the Graeco-Roman Near East, iconography, and numismatics. He is speaker of the Center for Mediterranean Studies at Bochum University.
Rubina Raja is professor of classical archaeology at Aarhus University, Denmark, and director of the Danish National Research Foundation’s Centre of Excellence for Urban Network Evolutions, based at Aarhus University. Her research interests are urban archaeology, architecture, iconography, high-definition archaeology, and material culture of the Mediterranean, in particular the Graeco-Roman Near East.